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The value of emotions (when writing your pitch)

Anger is worth more than excitement. Happiness is also great. Save your enthusiasm for the stage.
Standing oration
The value of emotions (when writing your pitch)
By Kristian from Speakers Loft • Issue #4 • View online
Anger is worth more than excitement. Happiness is also great. Save your enthusiasm for the stage.

Emotions sell. We know, but we don’t always act on it. I suppose this is handy most of the time. Daily life in a world where everyone act on their feelings all the time, would probably feel a lot like being a potato in a pot of furiously boiling gulasch.
But sometimes we do need to exhibit emotion. Selling is one of those moments.
Speakers put their merchandise in the windows of bureaus and directories (like we spoke about last week), much like a baker would do with his doughy masterpieces. While speakers can’t use the scent of freshly baked bread to lure in customers, we can paint pictures and convey emotions with words.
We thought we would ask a machine what wordy scent makes money for speakers.
We were right in that emotions sell. But we found something surprising too.
I’m so excited..
The machine hummed away for a bit, and I got a cup of coffee. While doing so, I wondered whether it would be an issue that the machine only looked at data for US speakers. I agreed (with myself) that this would be alright as long as the readers knew. Now you know.
As I came back to the machine, the humming was over, and the answer was pretty clear. Speakers usually describe their work in an excited tone-of-voice.
Do you sound excited in your pitch? Most speakers do.
Do you sound excited in your pitch? Most speakers do.
.. And I really should hide it.
Now for the good part. The analysis became really interesting when we decided to pivot the actual deal value of sales around sentiment ( remember we have quite the dataset) or put more plainly: Which emotion brings in the most valuable deals for speakers?
Anger does.
(We should clarify: a pitch is classified as angry when it is challenging the status quo, which is when a speaker writes something: “For far too long have we accepted bad leadership in the workplace. This stops now.”)
Listing emotions
The emotions ranked as follows in terms of value:

  • Anger (typically associated with higher value deals)
  • Happy
  • Excited (This is the sentiment most often conveyed, but not the most valuable!)
  • Fear
  • Sadness (Typically associated with lower value deals)

Happy was a close second to anger. Excited fell quite a bit behind in terms of getting-you-paid-effectiveness.
Don’t be afraid to work with emotions in your pitch. Tell you talented speaker-friend as well; they deserve to know too - even if they aren’t part of our little community.
The Glint of Light on Broken Glass
A quick word of warning. Don’t rush to your website to write everyone that you are angry about something. It is the emotion we are after - not the words. As one ridiculously talented guy (Anton Chekhov) once advised his brother:

In descriptions of Nature one must seize on small details, grouping them so that when the reader closes his eyes he gets a picture. For instance, you’ll have a moonlit night if you write that on the mill dam a piece of glass from a broken bottle glittered like a bright little star, and that the black shadow of a dog or a wolf rolled past like a ball.

It is not airy-fairy arts-talk. It is a well-fed, hard-to-lift piggy bank waiting to go to the market. Even when you describe something other than nature.
Want more?
LOOK INSIDE: The full length report from which we got the numbers.
LOOK INSIDE: The full length report from which we got the numbers.
We pulled together these numbers for our report on routines that build businesses. Write me at kristian@speakersloft.com if you want to know more about it.
That’s all for now. I wish you tons of success and remember that you have tons of speaker colleagues right here.
See you with a new edition in a week,
Kristian
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Kristian from Speakers Loft

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