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Fine-tune your pitch using Twitter

While writing the perfect pitch is hard, there is a sure-fire way of using data to see what resonates
Standing oration
Fine-tune your pitch using Twitter
By Kristian from Speakers Loft • Issue #23 • View online
While writing the perfect pitch is hard, there is a sure-fire way of using data to see what resonates with your audience. More often than not, this approach has doubled the effectiveness of our communication. It requires a bit of technical skill (and a Twitter-account with some followers).

THE PITCH
Let’s dissect the idea of a pitch. It consists of three parts:
  1. What is the problem?
  2. How do you solve it?
  3. What is your product?
You can add more elements if you feel like it, but this is the bare necessities. When you add more information, be aware that you also increase the cognitive barrier for potential clients. That means increasing the risk of losing their interest. You got to hook them with concise wording. These three elements are your building blocks. They need to be in every pitch. Following this blueprint, you may hear a pitch like:
“People increasingly feel lost in their lives, thanks to social media (The problem). You can offset the apathy with healthy habits (The solution). Book keynote speaker, XYZ for a talk at your school or organization (The product).”
Of course, you can do countless variations, but keep these building blocks in there. The variations are what we refer to as framing. Stay with me as we make a short detour about framing. This is also something we need to have a closer look at before we can get to the gritty details of gauging interest in your pitch.
Ready, set, go analyze your pitch. Photo by Braden Collum.
Ready, set, go analyze your pitch. Photo by Braden Collum.
FRAMING THE ISSUE
Let us assume that you have chosen to talk about increasing apathy due to widespread social media overload. There are several possible frames for this problem. They sound different, but the issue remains the same. What differs is how the frames resonate with people. This is important. Here are some examples of ways to frame the social media problem.
Social media is the new super drug, so let’s use what we know about addiction to protect ourselves. Book keynote speaker, XYZ for a talk at your school or organization.
(Frame: Social media is a drug)
Social media controls you through your fear of missing out. Learn to see what connections truly matter. Book keynote speaker, XYZ for a talk at your school or organization.
(Frame: Social media is social control)
Your brain is not built for social media. Re-learn how to create offline connections. Book keynote speaker, XYZ for a talk at your school or organization.
(Frame: Social media controls you through your biology)
Maybe one of these three resonates immediately with you. That is great, but it doesn’t mean others will react the same way. Even if you have an immediate favorite, you should still check them all.
No shortcuts.
SETTING UP THE EXPERIMENT
The frames approach the issue from different perspectives. Since you’re in the business of selling solutions that resonate, this is the key to working systematically with your social media presence. To utilize this on Twitter, you need to do the following:
If you have more than one talk, choose the one that you want to sell more of. Find five different frames for your talk. This may be hard, but it is always possible.
For each of you five frames, write down 5-10 tweets. When you are done you will have somewhere between 25 and 30 tweets. Schedule them for delivery on Twitter at random times over the next week or two. If you do not want to do that manually, you can use a (free) service like Tweetdeck to do it for you. if you do, you don’t have to log in to send every tweet manually. After your tweets are scheduled or sent, you sit back and wait.
Twitter can be more than just a timesink.
Twitter can be more than just a timesink.
GETTING THE RESULTS
When all your tweets have been sent, and 24 hours have passed after the last tweet, it is time to evaluate the results and see what triggered people. It doesn’t have to be precisely 24 hours after - any opportune moment after 24 hours is fine.
Navigate to analytics.twitter.com and click the tab ‘Tweets.’ Note down the engagement rate for each of 25-30 tweets. Group them by frame. Calculate the average engagement rate.
Your results could look something like:
(Frame: result)
Social media is a drug: 2.1% resonates with this.
Social media is social control: 1.5% resonates with this
Social media is control through biology: 3.2% resonates with this.
The one with the highest average is the best way to frame your work. Simple.
In our example, the last frame is a winner. Keep hammering away at that approach - it is the best thing you can do for your business.
That’s all for now. I wish you tons of success in your business pursuits and remember that you have tons of speaker colleagues.
See you with a new edition in a week. Thank you for reading. Keep speaking.
Kristian
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Kristian from Speakers Loft

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